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       (un)board         / 2015 / Primer, acrylic and fabric medium on engraved carpet / 24 X 36 inches     The work borrows visual elements of shamanic symbols, rug motifs, and rescue signals used in different cultures. The overall composition follows a Persian rug layout with a central motif in the “field” and “borders” surrounding the central area. An aerial view of a boat with an empty room or coffin and a symmetrical pattern of birds on a paddle occupy the central field. A three-headed-hawk has been considered as a symbol of guardian in Korean amulet drawings. Each head detects bad omens coming from different directions and protect its owner by averting evil. Morse code is encoded in decorative patterns in the main border. The motifs have references to the s of the Sewol Ferry that occurred on April 16th, 2014, which caused the death or presumed death of 304 passengers and as well as my personal experience. *   All works on carpet, except ‘Testimony(2015)’,  are engraved with an electric hair clipper.

(un)board / 2015 / Primer, acrylic and fabric medium on engraved carpet / 24 X 36 inches

The work borrows visual elements of shamanic symbols, rug motifs, and rescue signals used in different cultures. The overall composition follows a Persian rug layout with a central motif in the “field” and “borders” surrounding the central area. An aerial view of a boat with an empty room or coffin and a symmetrical pattern of birds on a paddle occupy the central field. A three-headed-hawk has been considered as a symbol of guardian in Korean amulet drawings. Each head detects bad omens coming from different directions and protect its owner by averting evil. Morse code is encoded in decorative patterns in the main border. The motifs have references to the s of the Sewol Ferry that occurred on April 16th, 2014, which caused the death or presumed death of 304 passengers and as well as my personal experience. * All works on carpet, except ‘Testimony(2015)’,  are engraved with an electric hair clipper.

   
  
 
  
    
  
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       Maze I         / 2015 / Primer, acrylic and fabric medium on engraved carpet / 48 x 72 inches      The work takes a layout of a central medallion rug common in Persian carpet design and turns itself into a maze space. In the central field, a maze that starts from a smaller room in the center and ends when it reaches a wall of the outer room is drawn. The white lines represent paths and the blue lines represent walls.  The rug borders are transformed into walls with open windows. In the Maze rug series, I wanted to explore different traumatic stages by making psychological rooms within the maze. In the “Maze I”, one can solve the maze to realize that she or he is still inside the room. The insolvable or inescapable room, however, is also an illusion drawn on a rug spread on a floor in a real room.

Maze I / 2015 / Primer, acrylic and fabric medium on engraved carpet / 48 x 72 inches  

The work takes a layout of a central medallion rug common in Persian carpet design and turns itself into a maze space. In the central field, a maze that starts from a smaller room in the center and ends when it reaches a wall of the outer room is drawn. The white lines represent paths and the blue lines represent walls.  The rug borders are transformed into walls with open windows. In the Maze rug series, I wanted to explore different traumatic stages by making psychological rooms within the maze. In the “Maze I”, one can solve the maze to realize that she or he is still inside the room. The insolvable or inescapable room, however, is also an illusion drawn on a rug spread on a floor in a real room.

  
 
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       Maze II          / 2015 / Primer, acrylic and fabric medium on engraved carpet / 48 x 72 inches     A white path is floating inside of a room. There is neither entrance nor exit. The recursive path is continuously connected. It leads a person to anywhere in the space but also to nowhere.    

Maze II  / 2015 / Primer, acrylic and fabric medium on engraved carpet / 48 x 72 inches

A white path is floating inside of a room. There is neither entrance nor exit. The recursive path is continuously connected. It leads a person to anywhere in the space but also to nowhere.

 

   
  
 
  
    
  
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       Maze III         / 2015 / Primer, acrylic and fabric medium on engraved carpet / 48 x 72 inches    An empty room is the most insoluble maze. A room is both an architectural and psychological space. It is spatial and temporal.     An infant born in a delivery room will lie down in a coffin – a room for the dead, one day or other. If a womb is a room for a fetus, an urn is a room for the dead. A room is a space where one starts and ends a day. A bedroom can be a nest for relaxation after a long day; however, it also can be a prison of isolation and insomnia.

Maze III / 2015 / Primer, acrylic and fabric medium on engraved carpet / 48 x 72 inches

An empty room is the most insoluble maze. A room is both an architectural and psychological space. It is spatial and temporal. An infant born in a delivery room will lie down in a coffin – a room for the dead, one day or other. If a womb is a room for a fetus, an urn is a room for the dead. A room is a space where one starts and ends a day. A bedroom can be a nest for relaxation after a long day; however, it also can be a prison of isolation and insomnia.

   
  
 
  
    
  
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       (un)board         / 2015 / Primer, acrylic and fabric medium on engraved carpet / 24 X 36 inches     The work borrows visual elements of shamanic symbols, rug motifs, and rescue signals used in different cultures. The overall composition follows a Persian rug layout with a central motif in the “field” and “borders” surrounding the central area. An aerial view of a boat with an empty room or coffin and a symmetrical pattern of birds on a paddle occupy the central field. A three-headed-hawk has been considered as a symbol of guardian in Korean amulet drawings. Each head detects bad omens coming from different directions and protect its owner by averting evil. Morse code is encoded in decorative patterns in the main border. The motifs have references to the s of the Sewol Ferry that occurred on April 16th, 2014, which caused the death or presumed death of 304 passengers and as well as my personal experience. *   All works on carpet, except ‘Testimony(2015)’,  are engraved with an electric hair clipper.
   
  
 
  
    
  
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       Maze I         / 2015 / Primer, acrylic and fabric medium on engraved carpet / 48 x 72 inches      The work takes a layout of a central medallion rug common in Persian carpet design and turns itself into a maze space. In the central field, a maze that starts from a smaller room in the center and ends when it reaches a wall of the outer room is drawn. The white lines represent paths and the blue lines represent walls.  The rug borders are transformed into walls with open windows. In the Maze rug series, I wanted to explore different traumatic stages by making psychological rooms within the maze. In the “Maze I”, one can solve the maze to realize that she or he is still inside the room. The insolvable or inescapable room, however, is also an illusion drawn on a rug spread on a floor in a real room.
  
 
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       Maze II          / 2015 / Primer, acrylic and fabric medium on engraved carpet / 48 x 72 inches     A white path is floating inside of a room. There is neither entrance nor exit. The recursive path is continuously connected. It leads a person to anywhere in the space but also to nowhere.    
   
  
 
  
    
  
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       Maze III         / 2015 / Primer, acrylic and fabric medium on engraved carpet / 48 x 72 inches    An empty room is the most insoluble maze. A room is both an architectural and psychological space. It is spatial and temporal.     An infant born in a delivery room will lie down in a coffin – a room for the dead, one day or other. If a womb is a room for a fetus, an urn is a room for the dead. A room is a space where one starts and ends a day. A bedroom can be a nest for relaxation after a long day; however, it also can be a prison of isolation and insomnia.

(un)board / 2015 / Primer, acrylic and fabric medium on engraved carpet / 24 X 36 inches

The work borrows visual elements of shamanic symbols, rug motifs, and rescue signals used in different cultures. The overall composition follows a Persian rug layout with a central motif in the “field” and “borders” surrounding the central area. An aerial view of a boat with an empty room or coffin and a symmetrical pattern of birds on a paddle occupy the central field. A three-headed-hawk has been considered as a symbol of guardian in Korean amulet drawings. Each head detects bad omens coming from different directions and protect its owner by averting evil. Morse code is encoded in decorative patterns in the main border. The motifs have references to the s of the Sewol Ferry that occurred on April 16th, 2014, which caused the death or presumed death of 304 passengers and as well as my personal experience. * All works on carpet, except ‘Testimony(2015)’,  are engraved with an electric hair clipper.

Maze I / 2015 / Primer, acrylic and fabric medium on engraved carpet / 48 x 72 inches  

The work takes a layout of a central medallion rug common in Persian carpet design and turns itself into a maze space. In the central field, a maze that starts from a smaller room in the center and ends when it reaches a wall of the outer room is drawn. The white lines represent paths and the blue lines represent walls.  The rug borders are transformed into walls with open windows. In the Maze rug series, I wanted to explore different traumatic stages by making psychological rooms within the maze. In the “Maze I”, one can solve the maze to realize that she or he is still inside the room. The insolvable or inescapable room, however, is also an illusion drawn on a rug spread on a floor in a real room.

Maze II  / 2015 / Primer, acrylic and fabric medium on engraved carpet / 48 x 72 inches

A white path is floating inside of a room. There is neither entrance nor exit. The recursive path is continuously connected. It leads a person to anywhere in the space but also to nowhere.

 

Maze III / 2015 / Primer, acrylic and fabric medium on engraved carpet / 48 x 72 inches

An empty room is the most insoluble maze. A room is both an architectural and psychological space. It is spatial and temporal. An infant born in a delivery room will lie down in a coffin – a room for the dead, one day or other. If a womb is a room for a fetus, an urn is a room for the dead. A room is a space where one starts and ends a day. A bedroom can be a nest for relaxation after a long day; however, it also can be a prison of isolation and insomnia.

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